Every new generation is a new crop that needs to be harvested for God.”

Reinhard Bonnke, Clergyman

Pros and Cons of Crop Rotation

advantages and disadvantages of crop rotation

Crop rotation can be defined as growing different types of crops on the same land across a sequenced growing season.

The technique of crop rotation has already been practiced thousands of years ago.

While there are many advantages of crop rotation, there are also some problems related to it.

In this article, the pros and cons of crop rotation are examined.

Audio Lesson

Advantages of Crop Rotation

  1. Improvements in soil quality
  2. Better soil structure
  3. Less water will be wasted
  4. Sustainable farming practice
  5. Reduces the risk for landslides and soil erosion
  6. Nutrients in the soil get only depleted pretty slow
  7. Higher crop yields in the long run
  8. Efficient land use
  9. Crop rotation as a natural remedy against weeds
  10. Pest cannot spread that easily
  11. Less need for fertilizers
  12. Less need for pesticides
  13. Diversification and hedging against economic risks
  14. Assurance of constant food supply for the local population

Improvements in soil quality

One crucial advantage of crop rotation is that it vastly improves the quality of the soil. If you only grow a single plant for many years, the soil will suffer a lot since large amounts of precious components are extracted out of the ground and in the long run, the land will lose its fertility and may no longer be suitable for farming anymore.

However, by using crop rotation instead, the soil will be able to recover since different plants need different minerals and while some sort of crop A will be intensive in mineral A, another sort of crop B will be intensive in mineral B.

Therefore, by planting sort A, large amounts of mineral A are extracted out of the soil. However, if the farmer uses crop B a few months later, large amounts of mineral B are extracted, while mineral A is able to recover.

Thus, by growing several different plants, the minerals and other components in the soil are able to recover much better, which preserves the fertility of the soil over the long run.

Better soil structure

Not only the overall quality of the soil will improve due to crop rotation, but also the structure of the soil will be optimized. Since different plants have different physical characteristics, they also affect the soil in different ways.

For instance, one plant may have much longer roots than others, which can loosen up the soil and improve the overall soil structure. Moreover, different plants favor different microorganisms in the soil, which further alter the structure of the soil.

Less water will be wasted

When the soil structure has been optimized due to crop rotation practices, it will be able to store significant amounts of water and less water has to be wasted. This is especially important in hot and dry regions where water is a quite scarce resource.

In those regions, every gallon of water has to be used as efficiently as possible in order to assure reasonable crop yields. Since the problem of water scarcity will become even worse due to global warming in the future, it is crucial that the soil preserves as much water as possible to use this precious resource in the most efficient manner.

Sustainable farming practice

Crop rotation can also be regarded to be the most sustainable farming practice. As we have seen before, planting just one crop all year round will soon lead to soil degradation and will make the land unsuitable for farming in the long run.

However, by using crop rotation instead, many different plants are grown and the soil is able to recover over the course of the year. Therefore, it is extremely important to apply crop rotation so that the soil will stay suitable for farming for many years to come.

Reduces the risk for landslides and soil erosion

Another upside of soil rotation is that it can also prevent soil erosion and landslides. Especially in areas where the soil is rather unstable, landslides are on a regular basis and many houses are destroyed every year due to that.

However, by planting crops all over the year, the roots of those plants will hold the soil together and soil erosion and landslides become less likely, which may protect the livelihood and the lives of many people all over the globe.

Nutrients in the soil get only depleted pretty slow

Due to crop rotation, the precious nutrients in the soil will only eventually get depleted. If crop rotation is done properly, those nutrients will be recovered back over time. Thus, it is crucial to plant many different sorts of crops in order to sustain the different nutrients in the soil and to assure the arability of land in the long run.

Higher crop yields in the long run

Since the nutrient and mineral supply in the soil can be assured for a long time due to crop rotation, also high crop yields will be possible for an extended period of time. In order to maximize crop yields, it is crucial to have an optimal nutrient and mineral mix in the soil.

This is the reason why with monocultures, crop yields often significantly decline over time since some precious minerals are depleted pretty soon.

However, with the help of crop rotation, a suitable mineral mix can be assured over the long run and crop yields can be maximized due to that from a long-term perspective.

Efficient land use

Since many different plants can be grown with the concept of crop rotation, it can also be considered to be the most efficient farming practice out there.

Over the course of the year, many different crops can be planted and harvested and the land will not stay uncultivated for an extended period of time.

Therefore, also in terms of efficiency, crop rotation has definitely an edge over other farming practices like monoculture, especially if we look at the outcomes on a long-term basis.

Crop rotation as a natural remedy against weeds

Weeds can be a significant problem in agriculture since those little plants can compete for minerals and other precious components with the farmed plants which can in turn lead to lower overall crop yields.

It is therefore crucial to reduce the number of weeds as much as possible in order to assure the optimal mineral and nutrient supply for the farmed crops.

Through crop rotation, weeds can be reduced naturally since different crops have different growth characteristics and weeds may not be able to adjust and compete against all of those different plants.

Hence, chances are that by growing different crops over the course of the year, the weed problem will be significantly smaller compared to growing just a single crop.

Pest cannot spread that easily

Another benefit of crop rotation is that pests are not able to spread that easily. If there is only one sort of crop all over the year, chances are that all sorts of vermin will be able to spread across large fields and the yields may significantly suffer due to that.

However, by planting multiple sorts of crops, the risk to lose significant fractions of the overall yield decreases since different crops have different characteristics and some may be much better able to defend against pests than others.

Less need for fertilizers

Since more precious nutrients can be conserved in the soil as a result of crop rotation, there is also less need to use fertilizers. While the use of fertilizers can generally optimize crop yields, it also implies serious problems since it can contaminate the soil and may make the land unsuitable for farming in the long run.

Therefore, it is crucial that farmers do not use excessive amounts of fertilizer in order to protect the soil. Hence, crop rotation is a natural way through which we can reduce the need for using fertilizers to a certain extent.

Less need for pesticides

Since pests cannot spread that easily across fields thanks to crop rotation, there is also less need to use excessive amounts of pesticides.

Since chemical pesticides contain all sorts of harmful components which we will eat later on when buying conventional vegetables or fruits in the supermarket, it is crucial to reduce pesticide use whenever possible in order to protect our health.

Thus, crop rotation can not only reduce the need for farmers to use pesticides, but it can indirectly also improve our overall health level.

Diversification and hedging against economic risks

Crop rotation has also crucial advantages for farmers. If farmers only rely on one crop in order to ensure their livelihood, they will be in serious trouble in case of unexpected events like the spread of crop diseases or pests.

In such an event, chances are that the majority or even the whole yield will be destroyed, which may have serious economic consequences for farmers.

By diversifying through crop rotation, the risks that are inherent in agriculture can be greatly reduced since farmers have multiple sorts of crops from which they can make money and even if one sort of crop yield will be destroyed due to various reasons, there are several other crop yields left to make money.

Assurance of constant food supply for the local population

Especially in the poor parts of our planet, many people rely on the yields of farmers in order to ensure their food supply. However, if crop yields are destroyed due to various reasons, those people may often suffer from extreme hunger and starvation.

Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the risks related to farming and instead of engaging in monoculture, crop rotation may be more suitable for those regions in order to assure the food supply for as many people as possible.

Disadvantages of Crop Rotation

  1. Significant initial investments necessary
  2. Crop rotation implies the need for a higher number of machines
  3. Needs plenty of experience to work
  4. Unexpected weather conditions may destroy sensitive plants
  5. Lack of knowledge regarding crop rotation in many regions
  6. Food companies have to buy all those different crops
  7. Infrastructure around crop rotation may be quite poor
  8. Lower profits for farmers on average
  9. Specialization on a single crop is not possible
  10. Efficiency of crop rotation depends on geographic factors
  11. Conflicts of interest in large farming corporations
  12. Short-term perspective may prevent the implementation of crop rotation
  13. Crop rotation is no magic pill to solve problems

Significant initial investments necessary

We have seen from the previous analysis that there are many advantages of crop rotation. However, there are also several issues related to it. One problem of crop rotation is that it can require a significant initial investment.

For instance, if you want to plant multiple different crops, you have to get additional equipment in order to optimize the growing conditions of the different plants. Moreover, you might also need additional equipment for processing the crops after the harvest.

Therefore, you may have to invest significant amounts of money at the beginning and many farmers, especially in the poor parts of our planet, will not have the financial capabilities to do so, even though this initial investment would likely pay off in the long run.

Crop rotation implies the need for a higher number of machines

Moreover, crop rotation may also imply the need for additional machinery. Different crops have different characteristics and in order to optimize the yield of every crop, the soil has to be optimized according to that.

Additionally, also in the harvesting process, additional machines might have to be used. Hence, the need for additional machines may further increase the overall costs related to crop rotation and may not be economically senseful for many small farmers.

Needs plenty of experience to work

Although crop rotation is a proven concept and it can work extraordinary well in terms of maximizing crop yields in the long run, it also requires significant knowledge to set up all the processes related to it in a proper manner.

If crop rotation is carried out improperly, there are significant risks that the overall yields will suffer dramatically. Crop rotation only works if the plants that are rotated will have different nutrient demands and if those crop combinations are chosen in an incorrect manner, chances are that crop rotation may do more harm than good.

Unexpected weather conditions may destroy sensitive plants

Although crop rotation can also be regarded as kind of a safety net for farmers since they do not have to put all their eggs in one basket, it still poses the risk that more sensitive plants will be destroyed due to unexpected weather conditions or other unexpected events.

While farming just one strain of a quite resistant plant may be able to deal with those extreme conditions, a fraction of crops that are planted due to crop rotation may be less resistant and therefore, the risk that a fraction of the overall yield is lost in crop rotation processes can be higher compared to the use of monoculture farming.

Lack of knowledge regarding crop rotation in many regions

Another downside of crop rotation is that in many regions all over the world, the knowledge regarding farming practices is quite limited.

Many farmers rely on monocultures and do not want to risk switching to crop rotation since their livelihood depends on the yields from farming and they do not want to give up things that worked properly for them until now.

Thus, in many regions all over the globe, although crop rotation would be better in the long run, farmers may still rely on monocultures due to traditions or also due to fear to lose their livelihood.

Food companies have to buy all those different crops

There is also an issue regarding the distribution chain of crops related to crop rotation. Since most of the crop yields are sold to local stores or to big food companies, those distribution companies have to accept crop rotation.

Also for those companies, crop rotation requires additional organizational work since they have to process many different crops on a regular basis compared to crops from monoculture where they can optimize their processes for just a single crop.

Thus, if those food companies do not support crop rotation, farmers may rather rely on monoculture instead since they have to maintain a good connection to those big food companies in order to ensure their livelihood.

Infrastructure around crop rotation may be quite poor

In many regions of our planet, also the overall infrastructure that is needed for proper crop rotation is missing. This is especially true for remote rural areas. Even if farmers engaged in crop rotation processes, the distribution chain would not be there. Hence, farmers would not be able to market their products in those remote areas.

Lower profits for farmers on average

Even though crop rotation can help farmers to hedge against single big catastrophic events that may destroy the whole crop yield, it may also lower the profits of farmers on average, at least in the short run.

Monoculture has the advantage that farmers can maximize the yield around one single plant that provides enormous crop yields, which in turn also maximizes the profits of farmers.

However, if this crop-maximizing plant is only grown for a few months of the year and on pretty confined space and many other plants with lower yields are grown instead, the overall profits for farmers may decline.

Specialization on a single crop is not possible

Another issue with crop rotation is that it is not possible for farmers to specialize around one certain sort of plant. Through specialization, yields can often be maximized since the knowledge around this single plant will be improved all the time due to the extensive experience of specialized farmers.

However, by engaging in crop rotation, farmers may not be able to gain this extensive knowledge and may not be able to optimize their overall yields due to that.

Efficiency of crop rotation depends on geographic factors

Whether crop rotation works or not also crucially depends on geographic and climatic factors. For instance, in quite hot and dry parts of our planet, crop rotation might not work since only a single strain of crops will be able to survive those extreme conditions and to grow in a sufficient manner.

Thus, depending on the geographic situation of farmers, monocultures may be more suitable than crop rotation practices in some regions of our planet.

Conflicts of interest in large farming corporations

Whether farmers want to engage in crop rotation or not is often also subject to extensive discussions. This is especially true for big farming corporations.

While some board members may want to engage in crop rotation practices, others rather may want to use monocultures in order to maximize profits in the short run.

Thus, depending on the preferences of the board members, it can be a quite political decision whether crop rotation is used or not.

Short-term perspective may prevent the implementation of crop rotation

There is often a conflict between the short-term vs. long-term maximization of profits. This is also true when it comes to farming. While monocultures might optimize profits in the short term, crop rotation will likely imply higher overall yields in the long run.

Hence, depending on the preference and the risk profile of the farmer, the decision might often be biased in favor of short-term thinking, which may result in excessive use of monocultures instead of crop rotation.

Crop rotation is no magic pill to solve problems

Although crop rotation has many benefits in the long run, it is no magic pill to solve all problems related to agriculture. For instance, there are many severe other issues that threaten the livelihood of farmers.

This includes global warming and also the serious related water scarcity issue, which may put many farmers out of business in the near future.

Top 10 Crop Rotation Pros & Cons – Summary List

Crop Rotation ProsCrop Rotation Cons
Soil quality improvementsHigh upfront costs
Improvements in soil structureAdditional machines may be needed
Higher crop yieldsPlenty of experience necessary
Better water conservationCrop rotation may do more harm than good
Lower risks for soil erosionConflicts of interest
Easy to learnSpecialization not possible
Less need for pesticidesMissing infrastructure around crop rotation
Less need for additional fertilizersFood companies may prevent crop rotation
Efficient land useShort-term costs vs. long-term benefits
Sustainable farmingNo magic pill to solve agricultural problems

Conclusion

As we have seen from the previous argumentation, crop rotation can have many important advantages and can improve the overall conditions for many farmers on a global scale.

However, it also implies some problems and farmers have to decide on an individual basis whether it makes sense for them to engage in crop rotation or not.

Sources

https://rodaleinstitute.org/why-organic/organic-farming-practices/crop-rotations/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crop_rotation

https://www.britannica.com/topic/crop-rotation

https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/crop/

About the author

My name is Andreas and my mission is to educate people of all ages about our environmental problems and how everyone can make a contribution to mitigate these issues.

As I went to university and got my Master’s degree in Economics, I did plenty of research in the field of Development Economics.

After finishing university, I traveled around the world. From this time on, I wanted to make a contribution to ensure a livable future for the next generations in every part of our beautiful planet.

Wanna make a contribution to save our environment? Share it!

Pin It on Pinterest